XXI DAE-BRNS High Energy Physics Symposium 2014

8-12 December 2014, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati Register Now

Public Events


Prof. Amitava Raychaudhuri

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Prof. A. Raychaudhuri is a leading theoretical particle physicist and the Sir Tarak Nath Palit Professor of Physics at the University of Calcutta. Prof. Raychaudhuri works in diverse areas within particle physics encompassing quantum chromodynamics, grand unified theories, classical solutions, left-right symmetric models, FCNC, supersymmetry, neutrino physics, extra dimensions, etc. He made pioneering contributions in CP-violation in supersymmetric models, the possibility of parity restoration at relatively low energies, neutrino masses and mixing in supersymmetric and other models and long baseline neutrino experiments. Prof. Raychaudhuri is a Bhatnagar awardee, Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, Indian Academy of Sciences, and the Indian National Science Academy; a recipient of the J.C. Bose fellowship, and a senior associate of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. He is also a member of the INO collaboration, and was the former director of HRI, Allahabad.

Title: Waiting for Godot? The future of particle physics in the short term

Abstract: Particle Physics has seen much recent success. The LHC has performed spectacularly and the experiments functioned exactly as planned. The Higgs boson has been found. It is confirmed that all three neutrinos mix among themselves. These and other success stories encourage us to hope for other breakthroughs. We attempt an overview of what lies ahead.

  • Date: 08/12/2014
  • Time: 6:00 PM -7:30 PM
  • Venue: Dr. Bhupen Hazarika Auditorium, IIT Guwahati

Dr. Jim Strait

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Dr. Jim Strait is an experimental particle physicist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in the United States. He is currently the Project Director for the LBNE experiment, an ambitious project aimed at understanding elusive particles called neutrinos, which are everywhere in Nature and may be key to understanding the structure of the Universe. India is an important collaborator on this experiment. During his career at Fermilab, which began in 1985, Dr. Strait led the US project to design and build advanced magnets and other accelerator components for CERN's Large Hadron Collider. Dr. Strait served as head of the Particle Physics Division at Fermi Lab from 2004 until 2008.

Title: The Elusive but Essential Neutrino

Abstract: The neutrino is the most abundant known matter particle in the universe but are the least understood of the known particles. Their very nature – almost massless, almost never interact with other particles – makes them very challenging to study. But understanding them is essential for understanding how the Universe works. They are involved in the reactions that make the Sun shine. Without them supernovae, which are the source of heavy elements of which the earth and all its life forms are made, would not explode. They may be key to understanding why the Universe is made of matter but very little, if any, antimatter. In this talk, I will give a brief history of the neutrino, and then give an overview of current experimental research into the nature of neutrinos. As an example of how a modern neutrino experiment is designed, I will concentrate on the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility, a new international collaboration which is being formed now, in which Indian institutions are expected to play a leading role.

  • Date: 09/12/2014
  • Time: 6:00 PM -7:30 PM
  • Venue: Dr. Bhupen Hazarika Auditorium, IIT Guwahati

Prof. Ashoke Sen

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Prof. Ashoke Sen is an Indian theoretical physicist and distinguished professor at the Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad. Prof. Sen started working on string theory in the mid-1980s, a time when the idea had gained credence as an attempt to explain the subatomic particles as multiple modes of vibrations of a single fundamental string. He has made a number of major original contributions to the subject of string theory, including his landmark paper on strong-weak coupling duality or S-duality, which was influential in changing the course of research in the field. In recognition of his achievements, Prof. Sen has been awarded the ICTP prize in 1989, S S Bhatnagar Award in 1994, G D Birla Award in 1996, and Padma Bhushan in 2013. In 1998, he won the fellowship of the Royal Society. He is among the first recipients of the Fundamental Physics Prize “for opening the path to the realization that all string theories are different limits of the same underlying theory”. He was the only recipient from Asia of this inaugural prize. Very recently in 2014, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) has awarded the Dirac Medal to Prof. Ashoke Sen.

  • Date: 11/12/2014
  • Time: 6:00 PM -7:30 PM
  • Venue: Dr. Bhupen Hazarika Auditorium, IIT Guwahati